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to the big cities and kabul. afghanistan is the whole country. the villages, the small towns. what is going to happen to them? also two weeks ago, the incident with the 14-year-old little girl, until they are 18 they are little girls, who was shot by the taliban because she wanted to be educated, because she was a blocker. and rather than expressing sadness about what happened, the taliban said they will be after her no matter what. so in order to help us understand what is going on and once nato leaves, we have with us a super speaker. hassina sherjan, you have the floor. >> good morning. nice to see you. it is great to be here. makes us think for the interest of having me here. and a conversation to see how you can join us for the afghan population. to give some background -- it is a question the always comes up. and i left a comfortable problem in america and went to afghanistan. my life in afghanistan is quite comfortable, and home was always home so matter -- the united states was a second home and a great place to go to school, but at the end of the day home is always home and when yo
reform. last month with anti-american protesters in the streets across the cities of morocco the foreign minister travelled to washington for our first-ever strategic dialogue. he could have avoided the cameras but instead strongly condemned the attack in benghazi, embraced a broader partnership with the united states and pledged that his country would continue working towards democracy and the rule of law. algeria also has much to gain by embracing the changes taking place around it and we have seen some progress. the government held parliamentary elections in may and invited international observers to monitor them for the first time. it moved quickly last month to protect diplomatic missions including the u.s. embassy and to defuse tensions in the streets. but still algeria has a lot of work to do. up hold universal rights and create space for civil society, a message i delivered at the highest level in person in february. what do these snapshots and stories from across the region tell us? on the one hand, last month, strains of extremism that threaten those nations as well as the broa
wonder if you have opinions on the new york city school warship which deals with off our and other religious groups meeting in those schools. >> i am against it. >> i am too and i can't understand it. it is bizarre to me. it is bizarre to me that new york has done its heels in on giving access to facilities on the same basis to religious groups they do to other groups. not talking about religion, just keeps on going. i would have thought they would have given up on that. it is a very bad idea, the new york policy is a very bad idea. >> they have the constitutional authority to do what it did. there is room for joints where governments can act to avoid and cause problems. >> the health mandate covered mine so i will follow-up on this. there was no religious representation of the september 11th memorial service. i will get into a point where we're so pluralistic religiously that the only way to accommodate everyone is no religion in the public square? >> i should hope not. i hope the response to the diversity is what the flowers bloom rather than spray roundup on them. >> i hope not
disaster. by the end of the day the donkey had sent a hoax through the city window, blood all over the car, relieved himself on a nun, been an a little girl. [laughter] >> i have never trusted donkey's since, george wrote. they deserve to be called as ses ses. [applause] >> it wasn't until after i was majority leader that i realize the value of that statement. [laughter and applause] >> he soon created an organization that enabled him to be at the biggest vote-getter in the state, 1956. becoming the first democrat to be sent to washington from south dakota in 22 years. he immediately became a force to be reckoned with in introducing a farm bill the very first day and over the course of several months passed more legislation than any one of the 44 new members who had come in with him at the same time. his constituents were the people for whom he fought. they were south dakota families barely holding on to their family farms. they were common working people in south dakota and all over the country. native americans. for people. hungry people. people others often overlooked.
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4